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vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
its attention to renewing a controversial surveillance law. they spent hours on this yesterday. some people say it violates the rights of americans. we'll look at the pros and the cons. stay with us. harris: new information about the u.s. soldier accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in a predawn rampage. the u.s. army is now saying it will seek the death penalty against staff sergeant robert bales. he faces premeditated murder and other charges in the attack on the villages that left 16 people dead among them women and children in southern afghanistan. that happened back in march. the attack drew such angry protests in the country the u.s. temporarily halted combat operations there. bales says attorney says his client should not serve the death penalty because he was serving the fourth deployment in a war zone. he is serving in fort lewis mccord in washington state. let's talk with a former prosecutor. >> thanks for having me. harris: let's start with what the defense team is saying. multiple deployments are a defense. why? >> they're saying because of multiple deployments there wa
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
americans from adopting russia children. i can't believe this happening in retaliation law for cracking down on russia human rights vialators. >> these children are not available to international adoption until after they have been on a domestic registry for eight months n our son's case, 22 families, russia families came to see him and rejected him because of his blood line. >> julia: this woman was on o'rielly and laura ingraham was hosted it . she had adopted two russian children. she doesn't know if they will see the boy. they have gone over there constantly to get close to the little boy. more than 60,000 russian children have been taken in by americans in the past two decades. massive winter storm that killed 16 people so far continues to move over the northeast. it is expected to head into canada today as many travelers are trying to get home after christmas. they had flights cancelled all over the place and delaying 8000 more. many northwest states saw a foot of snow . in vermont, 21 inches. hard-hit arkansas, 200,000 homes and businesses lost power. the bush family said, put away th
is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations, bans them from also traveling to the united states. i want to bring in our matthew chance from london. and matthew, of course, you were a correspondent in moscow for a very long time here. it seems at least there's a split. you've got russia's foreign minister who actually criticized putin before he signed this ban. so what is going on here? is this a power play? and is this something that is actually going to take effect? >> i mean, you're right. there has been a very rare split in the russian political elite about this issue. there's been some criticism that was leaked to the press in russia about how some officials including the foreign minister concerned about what the impact this may have. also an opposition newspaper in russia has issued a petition, saying the law should not been enacted. that's had more than 100,000 signatures. obviously, it's something that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power
's anticorruption law that denies russian officials from getting u.s. visas if they were associated with human rights violations. >> it's very tragic that these children are potentially going to fall victim to really the senseless politics. >> reporter: lauren koch with the national council for adoption says, with 700,000 russian orphans, the kids are the ones caught in the political web. >> most of them have been matched with children. they consider these children part of their families already. they have introduced, you know, them via pictures and other methods to their siblings here in the united states. and it's really heartbreaking. >> bring it over here so we can see it. >> reporter: a heartbreak that could become a reality for the fong family who can do nothing but wait, watch and hope. >> we're the fong family. we want to provide a home to just at least one boy from russia and, you know, we have a home, we have a lovely family, we're hoping that all this can move forward and this will be the last christmas he's alone. >> reporter: in reference to this ban, the u.s. state department s
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7